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WHBBH4 Call for Papers

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Plenty is happening in Black British History- according to the Mail on Sunday, the OCR GCSE course ‘Migration To Britain c. 1000 to c. 2010’ which we heralded at WHBBH3 has been condemned as ‘pro-immigration propaganda’. The #RhodesMustFall campaign in Oxford is provoking widespread debate about Britain’s colonial legacy, as well as the significance of our public monuments; and a new BBC Two History series ‘A Black History of Britain’, presented by David Olusoga, is planning to erect over twenty specially designed ‘BBC Black History plaques’ to record and celebrate people and events that are pivotal to this history.

Following the success of our previous events in London and Liverpool, we would like to invite you to the fourth of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies’ Black British History Workshops at Watershed, Bristol, on Thursday 7th April 2016. The Bristol workshop will be co-sponsored by the University of the West of England (UWE) and the Institute of Commonwealth Studies.

The aim of the series is to foster a creative dialogue between researchers, educationalists (mainstream and supplementary), artists and writers, archivists and curators, and policy makers. It seeks to identify and promote innovative new research into the history of people of African origin or descent in the UK, and facilitate discussion of the latest developments in the dissemination of Black British history in a wide variety of settings including the media, the classroom and lecture hall, and museums and galleries, thus providing an opportunity to share good practice.

At this fourth workshop, we would like to open the floor to presentations on any aspect of Black British History. As we will be in Bristol, local and regional or family histories from Bristol and the South-West would also be welcome.

The workshop will be divided into three panels, followed by a round-table discussion. Each panel will consist of three presentations lasting for 15-20 minutes.

Individual Papers

We would be delighted to hear from researchers, educationalists, artists, writers, archivists and curators or others interested in offering a presentation. Please submit a title and a brief description of your presentation either in writing (in which case, of no more than 300 words) or in some other form (for example a clip or podcast) to Dr. Miranda Kaufmann at miranda.kaufmann@sas.ac.uk by 26th February 2016.

Complete Panels

In addition, we would be happy to consider proposals for a complete panel. The panel should have a coherent unifying theme, and the proposal should include the abstracts of three related presentations and the names and affiliations of the presenters. We would also be interested in providing A-level students, undergraduates or graduate students with an opportunity to give presentations on projects relating to Black British History.

Registration

The day will run from 11am to 6.00pm, followed by a Reception. There will be a registration fee of £20 (£10 for students/unwaged) to cover the costs of lunch and refreshments. A limited number of travel bursaries will be available to independent speakers on application.

Registration for the workshop is now open. Book your place here.

Enquiries about registration should be sent to olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk.

WHBBH4 Videos

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 Welcome and Introduction

Session One Engaging with the Archives

The John Blanke Project  Michael Ohajuru

The plays and shows of Nigerian actor Orlando Martins 1895-1899: illuminating the world he lived in Ros Martin

Healing Through Archives Heather Agyepong & Abira Hussein

Session Two Women in Black British History

Work in Progress Valda Jackson

Remembering Sarah Parker Redmond: abolitionist and anti-racist campaigner Nicola Raimes

Session Three Local Black British Histories

Black history as strategy for positive identity and youth empowerment in the black community in Bristol  Nayah Yetunde & Hannah John

African American GIs in Devon and Dorset  Louisa Adjoa Parker & Crystal Carter

Hidden Presence: Comparative study of visualising the presence of Black people living in Georgian era Britain- an analysis of two participatory creative history projects.  Shawn Sobers

What’s Happening in Black British History? IV – Final Thoughts and Conclusions

Videos from WHBBH4 in Bristol April 2016  also available  are available on the SAS website, YouTube  and  iTunes  

WHBBH5 Agenda

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What’s Happening in Black British History? (V) Workshop

Thursday 27th October 2016
Wolfson Room, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House

Registration is now open Register here

10.00- 10.30 Registration: tea & coffee

10.30-11.00 Keynote address: Professor Kehinde Andrews (Birmingham City University)

11.00-12.30 Session One: Beyond Mary Prince: Black Women in Dialogue

Chair: Deirdre Osborne (Reader in English Literature and Drama, Goldsmiths, University of London)

Kareena Chin (MA Student, Goldsmiths), Mary Prince, Censorship and Publication
Heather Marks (MA Student, Goldsmiths), Women and Windrush
Heather Goodman (MA Student, Goldsmiths), Millennial Voices Janet Sebastian
Vanessa Igho (MA Students, Goldsmiths) The MA in Black British Writing: From Fiction to Fact

12.30-1.15 Lunch

1.15-3.00 Session Two: Recovering and Engaging the Public with Black British Histories

Chair: Professor Philip Murphy (Director of the Institute of Commonwealth )

Munira Mohamed (Learning Manager, Black Cultural Archives) and Monique Baptiste-Brown (Communications and Marketing Manager,Black Cultural Archives), Reclaiming heritage: Black Cultural Archives’ methodology for curating living heritage and evaluating the recent co-curated exhibition, Rastafari in Motion
Kate Morrison (Writer & Visiting Scholar, Book, Text and Place 1500 – 1750 Research Centre, Bath Spa University) ‘Go back & fetch what you forgot’: building a fictional character from the archives
Grace Quansah (Director, WAPPY: Writing, Acting & Publishing Project for Youngsters) Empowering Young Voices to Explore Heritage
Sophie Lillington (Museum & Heritage Manager, Epping Forest, City of London Corporation), Down in the Forest: a first foray into Black History

3.00-3.30 Tea/coffee

3.30-5.00 Session Three: Identity and Involvement in Doing Justice to Black British History in Schools

Chairs: Abdul Mohamud and Robin Whitburn (Justice2History)

Sharon Aninakwa, (Head of History at the Convent of Jesus and Mary Language College, Harlesden) Black Women in History and the School
Thabo Stuck (History teacher, The BRIT School for performing arts, Croydon). Becoming a ‘Choreographer’: challenges to doing justice to history
André Burton (PGCE student, Institute of Education, UCL) The importance of Black British History and the struggle for education in 21st century London

5. 15-6.15 Final Thoughts and Conclusions Panel 

Chair: Dr Miranda Kaufmann (Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies)

6.15-7.15 Reception

Registration is now open Register here

WHBBH5 Call For Papers

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Following the success of our previous events in London, Liverpool, and Bristol, we would like to invite you to the fifth of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies’ Black British History Workshops (WHBBH5) at Senate House, London, on Thursday 27 October 2016.

Keynote Speaker
For What’s Happening in Black British History? V we are delighted to have associate professor of sociology at Birmingham University Kehinde Andrews as our key note speaker, he is the course convenor of the very first undergraduate honours course in Black Studies at a British university

New Research and Panel Sessions
The aim of the series is to foster a creative dialogue between researchers (academic and independent), educationalists (mainstream and supplementary), artists and writers, archivists and curators, and policy makers. It seeks to identify and promote innovative new research into the history of people of African origin or descent in the UK, and facilitate discussion of the latest developments in the dissemination of Black British history in a wide variety of settings including the media, the classroom and lecture hall, and museums and galleries, thus providing an opportunity to share good practice.

We welcome proposals for papers and presentations on a wide variety of themes relating to the history of people of African origin or descent in the UK. These might cover subjects such as new approaches to teaching Black British History; the silencing/exclusion of Black British voices; the history of political/community activism; Black people in cultural and sporting history of Britain; and issues around gender including the role of women and members of the LGBT communities.
The workshop will be divided into three panels, followed by a round-table discussion. Each panel will consist of three presentations lasting for 15-20 minutes.

In addition, we would be happy to consider proposals for a complete panel. The panel should have a coherent unifying theme, and the proposal should include the abstracts of three related presentations and the names and affiliations of the presenters. We would also be interested in providing A-level students, undergraduates or graduate students with an opportunity to give presentations on projects relating to Black British History.

Deadline
We would be delighted to hear from researchers, educationalists, archivists and curators or others interested in offering a presentation. Please submit a title and a brief description of your presentation either in writing (in which case, of no more than 300 words) or in some other form (for example a clip or podcast) with an indication of which panel you envisage contributing to, to Dr. Miranda Kaufmann at miranda.kaufmann@sas.ac.uk by 15th July 2016.

The day will run from 11am to 6.00pm, followed by a Reception. There will be a registration fee of £20 (£10 for students/unwaged) to cover the costs of lunch and refreshments. A limited number of travel bursaries will be available to independent speakers on application. Requests to register should be sent to Olga Jimenez at olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk.

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